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01 June 2011

What's in your Filofax?: Information

Today in our What's in your Filofax? series the topic is information.

As we all know, I love all the international information that comes in the Filofax diary inserts. (Click here to see my post about it.)  I like to have as much information in my Filofax as possible, so that it's right at my fingertips when I'm out and about or traveling.

In my personal Deco I keep an entire tabbed section labeled International that houses all the international information pages from my Filofax diary inserts, for easy access. I like being able to find dialing codes, lists of holidays and religious festivals easily.

Now that I'm living in Indonesia I especially use these pages, because here there are lots of holidays I'm not familiar with. Luckily the Indonesian holidays are indicated on the day spaces (as RI), there is a list of Indonesian holidays in the International Information pages, and if I don't know the significance of the date I can usually find it on the Religious Holidays list. Holidays from a variety of religions are recognized here including Christian, Muslim, Buddhist and Hindu, so it's nice to be able to reference these easily.

I also use the international clothing size charts, and I especially appreciate that children's sizes are included!

I also have a page from my Franklin Covey weekly inserts that has a list of Holidays and Observances for 2010 through 2015, which is very handy.

I even have a perpetual calendar page that I cut out of a pocket size planner a couple of years ago and taped onto a Filofax page to fit on the rings. It allows you to determine what day any date falls on in any year from 1800 to 2050.  For example, what day is April 25, 2020?  It's a Saturday!

What types of pre-printed information pages do you like to keep in your Filofax? Or, do you feel like these pages clutter up your book and you prefer to keep them out?

11 comments:

  1. Though not having children of my own, I find the table of school holidays quite useful. We have to agree in the office who will have a vacation. So there's always the parents in advantage, when the vacation should be timed during these weeks.

    I have a couple of other pre-printed information sheets, as well. But I also have a section with empty pages, where I can file my own "necessary" information. Either by jotting them down or glue little pieces of paper there.

    Thomas

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  2. Would you post a picture of the perpetual weekday-calendar you mentioned? I'd LOVE to have one.

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  3. I have a tab that stores all the international info plus key medical/survival phrases in the language of whichever country I'm in (ie: Turkish, Kurdish, Laz, Armenian, Georgian, Farsi and Arabic, in preparation to my move to the region). I also include the contact information of the nearest US embassies and/or US military bases in case of natural or political emergencies.

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  4. I've removed the information sheets that came with my filo, as I just don't use them.

    Other printed sheets I do keep are for GTD: the workflow diagram & weekly review checklist. I also have a small Dalai Lama book at the back, after removing the cover & hole punching it.

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  6. @kathiza

    Try this one:

    http://web.visualgaze.de/dauerkalender.htm

    or this:

    http://web.whosting.ch/Dauerkalender/html/ewiger_kalender.html

    Both are in German but of course that is right up your alley.

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  7. I too was intrigued by the perpetual calendar so I went in search of a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. So far I've found this...
    http://www.calendarhome.com/cal100/?

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  8. Monkey that's exactly the sort of thing. I was going to post a photo of the calendar but didn't want to violate copyright laws! But there are lots of versions you can find online.

    I recently added a new page of information to my Filofax: F and C equivalencies for human body temperatures and fever. My daughter had yet another fever, my thermometer reads deg F only and I had to tell the clinic the deg C equivalent. I decided to do up a quick-reference chart so I don't have to do a conversion during those stressful moments. I wish my phone had a converter like my husband's has!

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  9. Laurie:
    C= 5 x (F-32)/9

    F= ((9xC)/5) + 32

    From the back of my Filofax solar calculator....

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  10. LOL Steve I have that too. But I can't do math when I'm stressed, and picking her up from the nurse's office at school and fighting traffic to get her to the SOS clinic was a very stressful situation. Easy reference chart = problem solved.

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  11. Yes I guess a look up chart is simpler.

    I have one for converting litres/100km to Miles Per Gallon. It's easier than doing the maths whilst driving!

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